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Baja marimba band* baja marimba band, the - moonglow/picnic theme / acapulco 1922


Steve Landesberg co-hosts; guests are comedian Jackie Gleason, comic David Brenner, R&B vocal group Ray, Goodman & Brown, actor Jimmy Martinez, Lena Briano and Marilyn Murray Willison authors of "Diary of a Divorced Mother".

As you look at A&M Records front gate, you see the corner of the Chaplin home under the A&M sign. The large brick building inside the gate became A&M Studios. The photo of the Executive Offices shows the exterior of Chaplin's home.

We would appreciate any additions or corrections to this discography. Just send them to us via e-mail . Both Sides Now Publications is an information web page, and we have no association with Liberty Records. Liberty Records is currently owned by the EMI Records Group. Should you want to contact EMI, or should you be interested in acquiring albums listed in this discography (which are all out of print), we suggest you see our "Frequently Asked Questions" page and follow the instructions found there. This story and discography are copyright 1999 by Mike Callahan.

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Musical Instrument Ranges and Names :: Key words:
range
tuning
information
* Family Name Instrument : Sounding Range
Concert pitch is the pitch at which non-transposing instruments sound link to : Table of sounding range and clefs used Instrument: Written Range
Standard open string tunings for stringed instruments
Note: string players are sometime required to mistune their strings. This is now called scordatura (. Biber's Rosary Sonatas; the viola part in Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante for violin, viola and orchestra) although originally it was called accordatura (. by Ariosti in his works for viola d'amore) 1 Bowed Strings (1) | Violin | more ...
sounds at written pitch Violino piccolo | more...
the small violin
information about tuning Viola | more ...
sounds at written pitch Viola d'amore | more...
instrument with six bowed strings and six steel strings, the latter neither bowed nor plucked
(tuning, from eighteenth century: A, d, a, d', f#', a', d'') Tenor Violin | more ...
tuned an octave below the standard violin Violoncello piccolo | more...
a small cello with an extra e'-string above the normal strings (C, G, d & a) Violoncello (Cello) | more ...
sounds at written pitch Double Bass | more ...
sounds an octave below written pitch with four strings
sometimes fitted with a fifth string tuned to low C Note: 4-string double basses are tuned in 4ths, distinguishing them from members of the violin family with their tunings based on 5ths. For this reason, the double bass should be classified as a member of the viol family. In which case, the largest member of the violin family is the violoncello. Rebec | more... Renaissance Violin | more... Baroque Violin | more... Twentieth-century Violin Octet | more ... 2 Bowed Strings (2) | Pardessus de Viol | more ...
sounds at written pitch Treble Viol | more ...
sounds at written pitch Alto Viol | more ...
sounds at written pitch Tenor Viol | more ...
sounds at written pitch Lyra Viol
a small bass viol popular in England during the seventeenth century. It differed otherwise little from the standard bass viol. Its repertory, notated in tablature, is pre-dominantly polyphonic and played mainly with the bow. The sources include pieces for one lyra viol or more, and lyra viol accompaniment for songs, by composers such as Coprario, Jenkins, William Lawes and Tobias Hume. At least 60 different tunings have been noted. Division Viol
an English form of bass viola da gamba, used in the seventeenth century for performing free ornamentation by varying given melodies. It was the equivalent of the European viola bastarda, and was smaller than a consort bass viol but larger than a lyra viol. Bass Viol | more ...
sometimes a seventh string added tuned to A below bass clef
sounds at written pitch also sometimes called the 'Viola da Gamba' although strictly all viols are 'da gamba', that is they are played down on the lap or between the player's legs (gamba being the Italian for 'leg' Consort of Viols | more...
the viol consort was introduced to England in the early sixteenth century and was mainstay of domestic music until the middle of the seventeenth century. After the Restoration of Charles II to the throne in 1660, things rapidly changed with the rise in popularity of the violin amongst court musical lfe and amateurs.
Composers soon ceased to contribute to the viol consort repertory, with some of Purcell's contemporaries such as Roger North regretting the change. North acknowledged that the violin was 'very excellent in it's kind', but thought that the 'noble Base Viol' embodied all its 'sublimitys'.
As North recognised, the viol was not entirely supplanted by the violin in the Restoration period. The bass viol remained in use as a continuo instrument in chamber music until the early eighteenth century, and the instrument acquired a new repertory of solos, duet and trios with continuo. Violone | more...
(Italian, literally 'large viol')
in modern terminology, the double bass viol, the direct ancestor of the double bass. Historically, the term has embraced a variety of meanings: any viol, a large viol (in particular a low-pitched viola da gamba), and even (in some Italian sources) the cello. The term is known as early as 1520. Electric Viola da Gamba | more...
one of the most exciting extensions of this remarkable family of bowed stringed instruments, the Ruby Electric Viola da Gamba is a seven-string bass viol. 3 Plucked Strings | Guitar | more ...
sounds an octave below written pitch. the guitar is a musical instrument, used in a wide variety of musical styles, and is also widely known as a solo classical instrument. It is most recognized in popular culture as the primary instrument in blues, country, flamenco, pop, and rock music. The guitar usually has six strings, but guitars with four, seven, eight, ten, and twelve strings also exist. Guitars are made and repaired by luthiers. Lute | more ...
the name lute refers both to any plucked string instrument with a fretted neck and a deep round back and specifically to an instrument from the family of European lutes. Lute and oud both descend from a common ancestor, with diverging evolutionary paths. The words 'lute' and ' oud ' may have derived from Arabic al‘ud , "the wood", though recent research by Eckhard Neubauer suggests that ‘ud may simply be an Arabized version of the Persian name rud , which meant string, stringed instrument, or lute. Gianfranco Lotti suggests that the "wood" appellation originally carried derogatory connotations, because of proscriptions of all instrumental music in early Islam. The player of a lute is called a lutenist, lutanist or lutist, and a maker of lutes (or any string instrument) is called a luthier. For tuning information on the lute please refer here The archlute is a lute with two pegboxes, the first being used for the main courses of strings (6 to 8 in number) that were played with the fingers of the left hand, and the second holding the longer strings, either courses or single strings, that were only played as open strings in the bass register. The archlute was particularly well adapted to continuo work, but nevertheless had a repertoire of solo pieces written for it. The archlute was the Italian baroque lute by definition.
The theorbo was apparently an extension of the archlute, its body being larger and the neck containing the second pegbox for the lower strings being even longer. The theorbo could reach a total of two metres in length. There were, however, various other differences, the theorbo often being strung with single strings and not in courses. Its tuning was also individual in that the first two strings were tuned an octave lower, this occurring because the main neckpiece was approximately 20 centimetres longer than that of the archlute. The third string was therefore the highest. Even though the instrument seems to have been almost specifically used for continuo work, there are some instances of its use as a solo instrument. Mandolin | more ...
sounds at written pitch a mandolin is a small, stringed musical instrument which is plucked, strummed or a combination of both. It is descended from the mandora. It is characterized by:

Although the most common tuning for the mandolin is in fifths, the same as for the violin (G-D-A-E, lowest to highest), guitarists may occasionally tune a mandolin to mimic a portion of the intervals on a standard guitar tuning to achieve familiar fretting patterns Ukelele/Ukulele | more ...
sounds at written pitch Five String Banjo | more ...
sounds an octave below written pitch Early Plucked & Fretted Instruments | more... 4 Harp | Orchestral Harp | more ...
written on two staves
sounds at written pitch the pedal harp, or concert harp, is large and technically modern, designed for classical music and played solo, as part of chamber ensembles, and in symphony orchestras. It typically has six and a half octaves (46 or 47 strings), weighs about 80lb (36 kg), is approximately 6 ft ( m) high, has a depth of 4 ft ( m), and is in (55 cm) wide at the bass end of the soundboard. The notes range from three octaves below middle C (or the D above) to three and a half octaves above, usually ending on G. Alexander Rannie adds: "since the majority of concert harps allow this top note to be played as g-flat, g-natural, or g-sharp, the actual range of the harp is from c-flat at the bottom to g-sharp at the top" (private communication). The tension of the strings on the sound board is roughly equal to a ton (10 kilonewtons). The lowest strings are made of copper or steel-wound nylon, the middle strings of gut, and the highest of nylon. Celtic Harp | more... Baroque Harp | more... 5 Flutes | Piccolo in C | more ...
sounds an octave above written pitch Piccolo in Db | more ...
sounds a minor 9th above written pitch in band music, the Db piccolo, rather than the larger orchestral C piccolo, was the mainstay until the early twentieth century, when the Db parts were gradually transposed for the C piccolo because of its stronger tone. The Db piccolo however, retains the distinction of being the first woodwind instrument to be added to the American brass bands of the mid-nineteenth century Flute in C | more ...
sounds at written pitch
[Cindy Pedder has written to point out that some flutes can actually play the B natural below middle C - this is achieved by using an extended foot-joint that pushes the range downwards a further semitone (from C down to B natural) - in every other regard the C flute with the low B extension follows the standard C flute fingering throughout the rest of the instrument's range] Flute in Eb | more ...
the Eb soprano flute or Terzflöte is somewhat smaller and sounds a minor third higher than the C flute. This less well known member of the flute family was originally used in . public school bands as a substitute for the more expensive Eb clarinet from approximately the 1940s through the early 1970s as well as a beginner flute for students with very small hands. Since its tone color and range was unlike that of the Eb clarinet, and since most beginners were either able to handle the C flute without problems or else buy one with a curved headjoint, manufacturers stopped making them around 1980. However, due to the popularity of flute choirs, one . manufacturer (Emerson) began to make them again in 1991, as there are more and more pieces of flute choir music that require the instrument. Its distinctive tone color, sounding sweeter than the C flute and more mellow than the piccolo, makes the Eb flute a unique member of the flute family whose potential is yet to be fully explored. Cindy Pedder writes, 'Playing a soprano flute usually means the flutist is playing in the sharp keys, something we don't often encounter when playing a C flute in a band.' Cindy notes also that the Emerson company stopped making the Eb flute several years ago. Cindy continues, "I know this because I purchased one of the last Eb flutes they made, and no one (to my knowledge) is making them now. I can't tell you how many people have offered to buy my little soprano flute, because the only ones you can buy now are used flutes. And since most of those were used in school bands, they are not in good shape! Flute choirs are big here in the States, and while not a lot of music is written for Eb flute, it is nice to have a voice between the flute and the piccolo, just as it is nice to have the alto between the flute and the bass." Alto Flute in G | more ...
sounds a perfect fourth below written pitch Flûte d'amour in Bb | more ...
the modern tenor flute, also known in the nineteenth century as the flûte d'amour or alto flute in Bb, is pitched one step below the C flute. It has the same fingering range as the C flute but sounds its best in the middle and low registers. It has a much stronger sound in the low register than the C flute and is, therfore, useful for transposing extremely low C flute parts to provide a better balance in orchestral or ensemble playing. Tenor flutes are currently made by Emerson and Altus and come in both closed and open hole models; however, with its somewhat larger tubing and wider-spaced keys, the closed-hole model is probably easier to play. Tenor flutes today are extremely rare and generally are only used for jazz as they are in the same key as tenor saxophones and clarinets, making it easier for the jazz musician to double on all three instruments Bass Flute | more ...
sounds an octave below written pitch Renaissance Flute | more... Baroque Flute | more ... Classical Flute | more ... Historical Flutes : general information
Rick Wilson's Historical Flute Page 6 Clarinets | Piccolo, Octave and Sopranino Clarinets | more ... Clarinet in E flat | more ...
sounds a minor third higher than written pitch Clarinet in B flat | more ...
sounds a major second below written pitch Clarinet in A | more ...
sounds a minor third lower than written pitch Alto Clarinet in E flat | more ...
sounds a major sixth lower than written pitch Bass Clarinet in B flat | more ...
sounds one octave below the Clarinet in B flat Contra Alto Clarinet in E flat | more ...
sounds one octave below the Alto Clarinet in E flat Contra Bass Clarinet in B flat | more ...
sounds one octave below the Bass Clarinet in B flat Clarinet Family | more ...
the clarinet has a distinctive timbre, resulting from the shape of the cylindrical bore, whose characteristics vary between its three main registers: the chalumeau (low), clarion or clarino (middle), and altissimo (high). It has a very wide compass, which is showcased in chamber, orchestral, and wind band writing. The tone quality varies greatly with the musician, the music, the style of clarinet, the reed, and humidity. The German (Oehler) clarinet generally has a darker tone quality than the French (Boehm) system. In contrast, the French clarinet typically has a lighter, brighter tone quality. The differences in instruments and geographical isolation of players in different nations led to the development, from the last part of the eighteenth century on, of several different schools of clarinet playing. The most prominent of these schools were the German/Viennese traditions and the French school, centred around the clarinettists of the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris. Increasingly, through the proliferation of recording technology and the internet, examples of many different styles of clarinet playing are available to developing clarinettists today. This has led to decreased homogeneity of styles of clarinet playing. The modern clarinetist has an eclectic palette of "acceptable" tone qualities to choose from, especially when working with an open-minded teacher 7 Saxophones | Sopranissimo Saxophone in B flat
construction difficulties mean that only recently has a true sopranissimo saxophone been produced. Nicknamed the "soprillo," this piccolo-sized saxophone is an octave above the soprano, and its diminutive size necessitates an octave key on the mouthpiece Sopranino Saxophone in E flat
sounds a minor third above written pitch Soprano Saxophone in B flat
sounds a major second below written pitch Alto Saxophone in E flat
sounds a major sixth below written pitch Tenor Saxophone in B flat
sounds a major ninth below written pitch Baritone Saxophone in E flat
sounds one octave plus a major sixth below written pitch Bass Saxophone in B flat
sounds one octave plus a major ninth below written pitch Saxophone Family | more ...
the saxophone was originally patented as two families, each of seven instruments. The "orchestral" family consisted of instruments in the keys of C and F, and the "band" family in Eb and Bb. Each family consisted of Sopranino, Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Baritone, Bass and Contrabass although some of these were never made (Sax also planned - but never made - a subcontra).
Of these the orchestral family are now rarely found, and of the band family only the soprano, alto, tenor and baritone are in common use (these form the typical saxophone sections of both military and big bands). The C-melody saxophone, a non-transposing instrument, was popular in the 1920s and could be played from sheet music for guitar and piano. The soprano has regained a degree of popularity over recent decades, and the bass, sopranino and even contrabass are still manufactured. Sopranino, bass and contrabass are rarely used except in large saxophone ensembles and saxophone orchestras.
The wide bore of the saxophone means that the larger saxes are extremely large and heavy, and recently (1999) an alternative contrabass, the "tubax," has been developed with a narrower bore. Although not a true saxophone, its bore leads to a more reasonable size and weight. 8 Double Reeds | Oboe | more ...
sounds at written pitch the baroque oboe as it was used at the end of the seventeenth century had its origin in such Renaissance instruments as the bombards, the shawms and the pifferi. Originally one of a family of instruments, the soprano oboe was the principal oboe that was still in use at the end of the seventeenth century. As was also the case with practically every other woodwind instrument at that time, its conical bore became narrower and its exterior became increasingly elaborate (cf. the recorder) with decorative mouldings and circlets. It was at first an orchestral instrument, particularly so in France but it soon went on to establish its own repertory in chamber music and sacred music. The oboe was also very popular in Italy, while . Bach was to make it one of the instruments he used most frequently for obbligato lines in his cantata arias. The two keys are used to overcome a limitation of fingering (for the low C) and to improve the quality of a note in the lower register (for the E flat) Oboe d'amore in A | more ...
sounds a minor third below written pitch this is a typically German instrument that dates from the first half of the eighteenth century, it being an oboe in A that sounds a third lower than the normal oboe. It also possesses a bell shaped bulge at its lower end that gives the instrument its characteristically warm timbre. It was mainly used as a solo instrument in chamber music although . Bach also used it as an obbligato instrument in cantata arias. Cor Anglais in F (English Horn) | more ...
sounds a perfect fifth lower than written pitch the baroque equivalent of the cor anglais was the alto oboe known in France as the taille de hautbois . It was first used in the second half of the seventeenth century in the French ensembles known as the bandes de hautbois , in which it played the inner lines of polyphonic compositions. Bach was also to make use of it when a low pitched oboe was needed to double the viola parts in the cantatas.
The oboe da caccia , always referred to by its Italian name, appears frequently in works by . Bach. It is also quite probable that Bach himself caused this particular type of oboe to be built. Several years ago various pieces of an instrument were discovered in the collections of the Copenhagen Instrumental Museum; these were carefully assembled and this enigmatic instrument was the result. It had a double reed, it was bigger than the normal oboe and had a curved body whose separate components were held together by a strip of leather, the whole ending in a metallic bell. What was more, it was noted with great surprise that the instrument had been first made by Eichentopf, the most well-known instrument maker of Leipzig of Bach's time. The puzzle over exactly what type of instrument Bach's oboe da caccia was had finally been solved. The oboe da caccia sounds a fifth lower than the normal oboe and can thus be linked with the alto oboe in F Heckelphone in C | more ...
sounds one octave below written pitch the Heckelphone was a musical instrument invented by Wilhelm Heckel and introduced in the late nineteenth century. It is similar to a oboe but with a wider bore and a deeper sound. Richard Strauss's 1905 opera Salome calls for a Heckelphone Piccolo Heckelphone in F the piccolo Heckelphone is a very rare woodwind instrument. It is a variant of the Heckelphone, that is pitched in F, a fourth above the oboe. It was developed and produced by the Wilhelm Heckel GmbH in Biebrich, Germany Bassoon | more ...
sounds at written pitch the precursor of the modern bassoon, the dulcian (meaning soft and sweet in Latin) was invented about 500 years ago. It was built in one piece and had a double reed made from cane. In England the dulcian was called the curtal. In the period 1643 to 1715, French instrument makers developed a new curtal that had four separate pieces and between 4 and 8 keys. It is remarkably similar to the modern instrument. During the 1700s, more keys were added as the range was extended. The most important change came in 1820 when Carl Almenader and his partner, Adam Heckel, developed a bassoon with a better sound. Their design, the German bassoon, is the model most often used today Contrabassoon
sounds one octave below written pitch 9 Trumpets | Piccolo Trumpet in A
sounds a major sixth above written pitch Trumpet in F
sounds a perfect fourth above written pitch Trumpet in E
sounds a major third above written pitch Trumpet in E flat
sounds a minor third above written pitch Trumpet in D
sounds a major second above written pitch Trumpet in C
sounds at written pitch Trumpet in B (rare)
sounds a minor second below written pitch Trumpet in B flat (Cornet)
sounds a major second below written pitch Trumpet in A
sounds a minor third below written pitch Bass Trumpet in E flat
sounds a major sixth below written pitch Bass Trumpet in C
sounds one octave below written pitch Bass Trumpet in B flat
sounds a major ninth below written pitch Trumpet Family | more ...
the first trumpets reputedly came from Egypt, and were primarily used for military purposes (Joshua's shofar , blown at the battle of Jericho, came from this tradition) like the bugle as we still know it, with different tunes corresponding to different instructions. In medieval times, trumpet playing was a guarded craft, its instruction occurring only within highly selective guilds. The trumpet players were often among the most heavily guarded members of a troop, as they were relied upon to relay instructions to other sections of the army. Eventually the trumpet's value for musical production was seen, particularly after the addition of valves around the mid 1830s, and its use and instruction became much more widespread. The Arabic word for trumpet was naffir . The Spanish used the Arabic name al naffir and changed it into anafil , while the French gave the trumpet its own name, buisine , derived from the Latin word buccina 10 Trombones | Alto Trombone in E flat
sounds at written pitch graphic provided by Raphael Vang

Collaborating with Alpert in the production was his usual cadre of musicians: Nick Ceroli (drums/percussion), Bob Edmondson (trombone), Tonni Kalash (trumpet), Lou Pagani (keyboards), John Pisano (guitars/mandolin) and Pat Senatore (bass). Perennial sideman, Julius Wechter , appears on marimba and percussion. Alpert provides lead vocals on "The Christmas Song" and "The Bell That Couldn't Jingle," and there are also appearances by a studio choir and string instruments, arranged by Shorty Rogers .


Baja Marimba Band* Baja Marimba Band, The - Moonglow/Picnic Theme / Acapulco 1922Baja Marimba Band* Baja Marimba Band, The - Moonglow/Picnic Theme / Acapulco 1922Baja Marimba Band* Baja Marimba Band, The - Moonglow/Picnic Theme / Acapulco 1922Baja Marimba Band* Baja Marimba Band, The - Moonglow/Picnic Theme / Acapulco 1922

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